Narwee

Narwee

 1809 
Richard Podmore, a free settler and soldier in the NSW corps, received a land grant where Narwee Primary School was to later stand. Richard Tuckwell, also a soldier in NSW corps was granted land between contemporary Penshurst Road and King Georges Road. Robert Townson received a land grant south of Broadarrow Rd for sheep grazing, however the land was unsuitable, being too hilly and rocky. Townson’s land was sold to John Connell, a Sydney Merchant, and became known as Connell's bush. The land in the area of these grants was dense, ironbark forest.
 1819 Tuckwell sold his grant to ex-convict, Patrick Moore.
 1820 Podmore sold his grant to ex-convict Robert Gardner, who named the property Sunning Hill Farm, however, the area was referred to as ‘Bob the Gardener's Farm’. The forest was very dense, providing refuge for bushrangers who hid for hid in the area for weeks at a time. The Sydney Hunt Club held its meetings in the area and newspaper reports detailed the hunting of deer in the vicinity of ‘Bob the Gardener's Farm’.
 1858 Foster Anderson, ex-convict, purchased 30 acres of land at Forestgrove in the Parish of St George for £265 from John Daniel Welch. This land is in present day Narwee, bounded by Bonds and Hannans Roads and Karne and Arilla Avenues.
 1873 Robert Gardener died and left Sunning Hill Farm to relatives.
 1879 Matthew Harris purchased Anderson's land for £325.
 1880s William Graham Cameron purchased Sunning Hill Farm from Robert Gardner’s relatives hoping to capitalise on the railway which was planned to cross the land.
 1912 The former Sunning Hill Farm was subdivided by the Intercolonial Investment Land and Building Company Ltd and sold as ten acre farms of the ‘Graham Park Estate’, each costing between £65 and £142.
 1931 Narwee railway station was opened by the Department of Railways on 21 December 1931. Narwee was said to be an aboriginal word for sun and therefore may have been named after Sunning Hill Farm.
 1948 Narwee Post Office was opened. The railway was electrified and a double track extended from Kingsgrove.
 1949 The Narwee shopping centre foundation stone was laid on 28 October.
 1950 Narwee Infants' School was opened on 30 January. The school comprised approximately 90 students who were accommodated in a double timber portable building.
 1956 Narwee Pre-school Kindergarten Centre officially opened on 22 September.
 1958 Narwee Boy’s High School was opened at Mountview Avenue and Wilson Street.
 1965 Charles George Baumann sells his last piece of land and in doing so, closes one of Sydney’s oldest market gardens, putting an end to farming in Narwee.
 1983 2NBC FM 90.1, Sydney’s first fulltime community radio station was established at Narwee Baptist Church on 6 May, operated by local volunteers.
 1987 Rail service was extended to Glenfield.
 1991 Narwee Boys High became a co-educational school.
 2000 The railway service was re-designed with direct services to the city via the domestic and international airports.
 2001 Narwee High School was closed.
 2008 The Emery Residences Estate was developed on the former Narwee High School site. The new streets of the estate were named with the assistance of local residents. Podmore Avenue and Tuckwell Drive were named in honour of the original land grantees from 1809. Wallace Square took its name from the former town clerk/general manager, Howard Wallace who served at Hurstville Council from 1978 to 2002. Esme Lane Parade was named in honour of Esme Lane who established the 1st Narwee Scouts in 1950 and received an OAM in 1999 for her services to youth through the scouts movement.

Sources
Muir, Lesley. Narwee: Early History, Canterbury & District Historical Society Journal Series 2, No. 12.
Campbell, Annie, Narwee ; A Heritage Study. 2004 . St George Regional Museum.
Sergeant, Bernard, The History of Hurstville 1887 -1992.